biocas:

Kary Mullis details his experiences synthesizing and testing various psychedelic amphetamines and a difficult trip on DET in his autobiography. In a Q&A interview published in the September, 1994, issue of California Monthly, Mullis said, “Back in the 1960s and early ’70s I took plenty of LSD. A lot of people were doing that in Berkeley back then. And I found it to be a mind-opening experience. It was certainly much more important than any courses I ever took.” During a symposium held for centenarian Albert Hofmann, “Hofmann revealed that he was told by Nobel-prize-winning chemist Kary Mullis that LSD had helped him develop the polymerase chain reaction that helps amplify specific DNA sequences.” Replying to his own postulate during an interview for BBC’s Psychedelic Science documentary, “What if I had not taken LSD ever; would I have still invented PCR?” He replied, “I don’t know. I doubt it. I seriously doubt it.”

(I am not being sarcastic) It gets better:

"Mullis reported an encounter with a glowing green raccoon at his cabin in the woods of northern California around midnight one night in 1985."

Timestamp: 1406598780

biocas:

Kary Mullis details his experiences synthesizing and testing various psychedelic amphetamines and a difficult trip on DET in his autobiography. In a Q&A interview published in the September, 1994, issue of California Monthly, Mullis said, “Back in the 1960s and early ’70s I took plenty of LSD. A lot of people were doing that in Berkeley back then. And I found it to be a mind-opening experience. It was certainly much more important than any courses I ever took.” During a symposium held for centenarian Albert Hofmann, “Hofmann revealed that he was told by Nobel-prize-winning chemist Kary Mullis that LSD had helped him develop the polymerase chain reaction that helps amplify specific DNA sequences.” Replying to his own postulate during an interview for BBC’s Psychedelic Science documentary, “What if I had not taken LSD ever; would I have still invented PCR?” He replied, “I don’t know. I doubt it. I seriously doubt it.”

(I am not being sarcastic) It gets better:

"Mullis reported an encounter with a glowing green raccoon at his cabin in the woods of northern California around midnight one night in 1985."

Same

(Source: ronchorama, via hyperwave)

Timestamp: 1406596128

Same

(Source: ronchorama, via hyperwave)

nugat:

10/10

(via hyperwave)

Timestamp: 1406520743

nugat:

10/10

(via hyperwave)

"Students from the University of Surrey imprinted their phones on Petri dishes to culture any bacteria on them. Here the whole plate is covered by the spreading growth of a bacterium called Bacillus mycoides"

Timestamp: 1406520311

"Students from the University of Surrey imprinted their phones on Petri dishes to culture any bacteria on them. Here the whole plate is covered by the spreading growth of a bacterium called Bacillus mycoides"

ultrafunnypictures:

My sister got a microscope for her birthday

(via leftovermark)

Timestamp: 1406519508

ultrafunnypictures:

My sister got a microscope for her birthday

(via leftovermark)

thelovelyseas:

Blue Starfish by Georgette Douwma

(Source: ashlandrenee, via kairahara)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Wingtip vortices are a result of the finite length of a wing. Airplanes generate lift by having low-pressure air travelling over the top of the wing and higher pressure air along the bottom. If the wing were infinite, the two flows would remain separate. Instead, the high-pressure air from under the wing sneaks around the wingtip to reach the lower pressure region. This creates the vorticity that trails behind the aircraft. I was first introduced to the concept of wingtip vortices in my junior year during introductory fluid dynamics. As I recall, the concept was utterly bizarre and so difficult to wrap our heads around that everyone, including the TA, had trouble figuring out which way the vortices were supposed to spin. A few good photos and videos would have helped, I’m sure. (Photo credits: U.S. Coast Guard, S. Morris, Nat. Geo/BBC2)

Timestamp: 1406518759

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Wingtip vortices are a result of the finite length of a wing. Airplanes generate lift by having low-pressure air travelling over the top of the wing and higher pressure air along the bottom. If the wing were infinite, the two flows would remain separate. Instead, the high-pressure air from under the wing sneaks around the wingtip to reach the lower pressure region. This creates the vorticity that trails behind the aircraft. I was first introduced to the concept of wingtip vortices in my junior year during introductory fluid dynamics. As I recall, the concept was utterly bizarre and so difficult to wrap our heads around that everyone, including the TA, had trouble figuring out which way the vortices were supposed to spin. A few good photos and videos would have helped, I’m sure. (Photo credits: U.S. Coast Guard, S. Morris, Nat. Geo/BBC2)

(Source: pspness, via thelovelyloner)

flameburner:

camfloyd:

‘Synth-Sense’ - graphite/acrylic/digital

This is cool

(via nevesnevele)

Timestamp: 1406518102

flameburner:

camfloyd:

‘Synth-Sense’ - graphite/acrylic/digital

This is cool

(via nevesnevele)

currentsinbiology:

earthlynation:

Las Gralarias Glassfrog (Nymphargus lasgralarias) (by Lucas M. Bustamante-Enríquez)

Tadpode bubbles…

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Timestamp: 1406518027

currentsinbiology:

earthlynation:

Las Gralarias Glassfrog (Nymphargus lasgralarias) (by Lucas M. Bustamante-Enríquez)

Tadpode bubbles…

(via scienceyoucanlove)

lovejapanese80s:

ストップひ!!ばりくん!

(Source: rankobon, via violetsystems)

Timestamp: 1406518022

lovejapanese80s:

ストップひ!!ばりくん!

(Source: rankobon, via violetsystems)

Plasmodium falciparum.  A cross section through a human red blood cell, showing single-celled malaria parasites (in blue).

Timestamp: 1406411996

Plasmodium falciparum.  A cross section through a human red blood cell, showing single-celled malaria parasites (in blue).